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A veteran says goodbye to the B-cycle bikes he loved

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A veteran says goodbye to the B-cycle bikes he loved

Mark Howard moved to Denver to get help from the Veterans Administration. It was the bikes he took to get there that helped him as well.

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Letters: How to handle Thornton’s thirst (11/22/20)

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How to handle Thornton’s thirst

Re: “Pipeline rejection by Larimer County could reduce Thornton’s future growth,” Nov. 15 news story

No one in Larimer County contests Thornton’s rights to Poudre River water — but they must convey it through our county without compromising the property rights of Larimer residents. It’s their water, but it’s our dirt. We believe that the best conveyance is the Poudre River. If they have doubts about the usability of water from some point that is downstream of their current point of diversion, any concerns about water quality are best addressed by negotiations with Larimer County and its communities. Until Thornton abandons its bullying litigation, a total lack of progress toward resolving the impasse is assured.

Jim McCauley, Fort Collins


To continue to grow population beyond the “carrying capacity” of our water, energy and resources illustrates the height of intellectual arrogance in Colorado, as well as the rest of the United States.

Exponential growth in Denver imitates the growth of a cancer cell. It, too, continues to grow aberrantly until it kills its host. Such growth will crush our wilderness, destroy our mountains, stomp on our quality of life and kill our standard of living. It will ensure breathing toxic air 24/7 by all residents, endless gridlocked traffic and total ruination of weekend camping or ski trips into the mountains.

Exactly why does any mayor, governor or city council want to bring that upon the citizens of this state? Can you give one good reason to bequeath such a miserable future upon future generations? And, where do you think it will all end when that last drop of water is squeezed out of the mountains?

Frosty Wooldridge, Golden


Election analysis from the columnists

Re: “It was a drubbing for the GOP” and “Blue wave, what blue wave?” Nov. 15 commentaries

All you need to know about the difference between the two political parties can be found in their competing reviews of the 2020 election. Ian Silverii used his column to describe the ideas that got the Democrats over the finish line, while George Brauchler focused on future redistricting to save the day for the Republicans.

Colin Callahan, Denver


George Brauchler correctly noted that the expected “blue wave” did not occur. He celebrated Lauren Boebert’s success in winning the U. S. House seat for Colorado District 3. While Boebert’s win surprised me, she won her contest fair and square and thus has earned the right to serve her constituents. My concern was his comments about John Hickenlooper’s decisive win over Sen. Cory Gardner. Note that Brauchler contradicts himself: He notes there was no blue wave; the huge anti-Trump vote did not happen, but Hick beat Gardner by a large margin. Hickenlooper beat Gardner on his own merit. Hickenlooper was a successful and popular Denver mayor and Colorado governor and has earned Coloradan’s trust. Brauchler stated on the topic of Gardner’s loss: “… lost by a large margin to a candidate who … I just cannot go there … but you get the point.” No, Mr. Brauchler, I don’t get the point. What I get is an ignorant and disrespectful attitude.

Jim Rankin, Highlands Ranch


Pointing fingers in the assault on democracy

Re: “The Republican Party is attacking democracy,” Nov. 15 commentary

Why is requesting a review of voting legality in a few states an attack on the 2020 election? Didn’t Stacey Abrams call for recounts and question votes etc. in her governor run in Georgia? No foul was called on her by the press.

All the Republican action is legal and if we are concerned about free elections, what is wrong with a few checks that are within the law and will identify any violations in voting. Let the chips fall where they may.

If everything is found to be legal or minor discrepancies, what a great way to instill confidence in our system.

Perhaps an article for The Post to run would be the one titled “Let the transition Proceed” by Charles Lipson last week in The Wall Street Journal. That article sets a better tone with regard to Joe Biden’s “let’s work together” than The Post article “The Republican Party is attacking democracy.”

But maybe The Post’s intent isn’t to bring people together, but rather to convert people to their perception.

Kenneth E. Toombs, Highlands Ranch


Your headline in Perspective made me laugh. After Trump was elected in 2016, the Democrats tried to undermine that election by lying for years about Russian collusion and their reasons for impeachment. Funny, we never saw the headline, “The Democratic Party is attacking democracy,” during all that time.

Carol Czaplinski, Golden


Diving into the Electoral College debate

Re: “Abandoning the Electoral College,” Nov. 15 editorial

Regarding your editorial last Sunday, I particularly liked the sentence:

“Today, the unintended consequence of the Electoral College is to preserve the power of white voting blocs while diluting the voice of more diverse urban centers in America.” White voting blocs, in this case, include entire states, like Wyoming. How embarrassing.

The only objection I have to your statement is the word “unintended.” If it is not intended, why has Congress not revised the number of seats in the House of Representatives for nine decades? The last time it came with the 1929 Permanent Apportionment Act, when the Republican-controlled Congress arrived at the 435 seat number using 1910 census data. The 1920 numbers weren’t to their liking because of the shift in population to urban centers following “The Great Migration” during and after World War I.

Increasing the number of House seats proportionately to distribution and increases in population would address the dilution of voting power that exists for urban voters. Adding 100-plus seats in the House, per the proposed “Wyoming Rule,” would add 100-plus electors to the anemic Electoral College. If Congress won’t do this, the Electoral College has to go. It is a racist embarrassment.

Aren’t we as a nation better than this?

Pete Simon, Arvada


Colorado approved Proposition 113 as an alternative to the current Electoral College allocation method. This was presented as the only choice between the status quo (Option 1) and the popular vote (Option 2). However, there is an Option 3 already in place in Nebraska and Maine that perhaps should have been in the mix.

This alternative assigns two of each state’s electoral votes based on the popular vote statewide, similar to the vote for its senators. The remaining electoral votes are assigned based on the popular vote in each individual congressional district, reflecting the district’s unique urban, suburban rural or demographic character. While this allocation does not follow a national popular vote, it does reflect the fact that most states are mix of such characteristics that should have their own democratic voice in an election.

The editorial indirectly recognized this mix. As this debate continues, can we throw Option 3 into the hopper? This method seems to work very well for these two states. However, it is a compromise. (What a novel idea.)

John and Joanne Tobin, Evergreen


How can a venerable publication like The Denver Post, which prides itself as being “The Voice of the Rocky Mountain Empire” be so ill-informed and misguided in advocating for and promoting a popular vote for presidential elections? The claim that “Each vote for president in America should count as one vote” — while itself true — overlooks the fact that a popular vote would essentially negate all citizen votes in this and other regions. The Electoral College, a stroke of genius by our Founding Fathers, keeps people from all states “in the game.”

Curtis E. Burton, Highlands Ranch


The maps of election results for president for the second straight election show a large majority of the geographical country voting Republican and the vast majority of the inner-city populations of cities like New York voting Democratic.

Our country’s “civil war” is not just liberal vs. conservative. It is very much large-city urbanites vs. everyone else. It’s obvious just looking at results on a map: Washington state is liberal — no, it’s not, Seattle and other urban areas overpower the rest of the state. Look at New York State vs. New York City, along with the election maps of Georgia and Texas. Colorado is not “blue” — but the Denver/Boulder corridor is — and that makes much of the rest of the state irrelevant. If we want “fairness” in our culturally diverse nation, I have a completely different suggestion. Instead of eliminating the Electoral College, let’s require all states to set up an internal Electoral College. What do you say Grand Junction, Greeley and Cortez? Do you want to be relevant in Colorado politics?

Mark Harvey, Arvada

To send a letter to the editor about this article, submit online or check out our guidelines for how to submit by email or mail.

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Letters: How to handle Thornton’s thirst (11/22/20)

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How to handle Thornton’s thirst

Re: “Pipeline rejection by Larimer County could reduce Thornton’s future growth,” Nov. 15 news story

No one in Larimer County contests Thornton’s rights to Poudre River water — but they must convey it through our county without compromising the property rights of Larimer residents. It’s their water, but it’s our dirt. We believe that the best conveyance is the Poudre River. If they have doubts about the usability of water from some point that is downstream of their current point of diversion, any concerns about water quality are best addressed by negotiations with Larimer County and its communities. Until Thornton abandons its bullying litigation, a total lack of progress toward resolving the impasse is assured.

Jim McCauley, Fort Collins


To continue to grow population beyond the “carrying capacity” of our water, energy and resources illustrates the height of intellectual arrogance in Colorado, as well as the rest of the United States.

Exponential growth in Denver imitates the growth of a cancer cell. It, too, continues to grow aberrantly until it kills its host. Such growth will crush our wilderness, destroy our mountains, stomp on our quality of life and kill our standard of living. It will ensure breathing toxic air 24/7 by all residents, endless gridlocked traffic and total ruination of weekend camping or ski trips into the mountains.

Exactly why does any mayor, governor or city council want to bring that upon the citizens of this state? Can you give one good reason to bequeath such a miserable future upon future generations? And, where do you think it will all end when that last drop of water is squeezed out of the mountains?

Frosty Wooldridge, Golden


Election analysis from the columnists

Re: “It was a drubbing for the GOP” and “Blue wave, what blue wave?” Nov. 15 commentaries

All you need to know about the difference between the two political parties can be found in their competing reviews of the 2020 election. Ian Silverii used his column to describe the ideas that got the Democrats over the finish line, while George Brauchler focused on future redistricting to save the day for the Republicans.

Colin Callahan, Denver


George Brauchler correctly noted that the expected “blue wave” did not occur. He celebrated Lauren Boebert’s success in winning the U. S. House seat for Colorado District 3. While Boebert’s win surprised me, she won her contest fair and square and thus has earned the right to serve her constituents. My concern was his comments about John Hickenlooper’s decisive win over Sen. Cory Gardner. Note that Brauchler contradicts himself: He notes there was no blue wave; the huge anti-Trump vote did not happen, but Hick beat Gardner by a large margin. Hickenlooper beat Gardner on his own merit. Hickenlooper was a successful and popular Denver mayor and Colorado governor and has earned Coloradan’s trust. Brauchler stated on the topic of Gardner’s loss: “… lost by a large margin to a candidate who … I just cannot go there … but you get the point.” No, Mr. Brauchler, I don’t get the point. What I get is an ignorant and disrespectful attitude.

Jim Rankin, Highlands Ranch


Pointing fingers in the assault on democracy

Re: “The Republican Party is attacking democracy,” Nov. 15 commentary

Why is requesting a review of voting legality in a few states an attack on the 2020 election? Didn’t Stacey Abrams call for recounts and question votes etc. in her governor run in Georgia? No foul was called on her by the press.

All the Republican action is legal and if we are concerned about free elections, what is wrong with a few checks that are within the law and will identify any violations in voting. Let the chips fall where they may.

If everything is found to be legal or minor discrepancies, what a great way to instill confidence in our system.

Perhaps an article for The Post to run would be the one titled “Let the transition Proceed” by Charles Lipson last week in The Wall Street Journal. That article sets a better tone with regard to Joe Biden’s “let’s work together” than The Post article “The Republican Party is attacking democracy.”

But maybe The Post’s intent isn’t to bring people together, but rather to convert people to their perception.

Kenneth E. Toombs, Highlands Ranch


Your headline in Perspective made me laugh. After Trump was elected in 2016, the Democrats tried to undermine that election by lying for years about Russian collusion and their reasons for impeachment. Funny, we never saw the headline, “The Democratic Party is attacking democracy,” during all that time.

Carol Czaplinski, Golden


Diving into the Electoral College debate

Re: “Abandoning the Electoral College,” Nov. 15 editorial

Regarding your editorial last Sunday, I particularly liked the sentence:

“Today, the unintended consequence of the Electoral College is to preserve the power of white voting blocs while diluting the voice of more diverse urban centers in America.” White voting blocs, in this case, include entire states, like Wyoming. How embarrassing.

The only objection I have to your statement is the word “unintended.” If it is not intended, why has Congress not revised the number of seats in the House of Representatives for nine decades? The last time it came with the 1929 Permanent Apportionment Act, when the Republican-controlled Congress arrived at the 435 seat number using 1910 census data. The 1920 numbers weren’t to their liking because of the shift in population to urban centers following “The Great Migration” during and after World War I.

Increasing the number of House seats proportionately to distribution and increases in population would address the dilution of voting power that exists for urban voters. Adding 100-plus seats in the House, per the proposed “Wyoming Rule,” would add 100-plus electors to the anemic Electoral College. If Congress won’t do this, the Electoral College has to go. It is a racist embarrassment.

Aren’t we as a nation better than this?

Pete Simon, Arvada


Colorado approved Proposition 113 as an alternative to the current Electoral College allocation method. This was presented as the only choice between the status quo (Option 1) and the popular vote (Option 2). However, there is an Option 3 already in place in Nebraska and Maine that perhaps should have been in the mix.

This alternative assigns two of each state’s electoral votes based on the popular vote statewide, similar to the vote for its senators. The remaining electoral votes are assigned based on the popular vote in each individual congressional district, reflecting the district’s unique urban, suburban rural or demographic character. While this allocation does not follow a national popular vote, it does reflect the fact that most states are mix of such characteristics that should have their own democratic voice in an election.

The editorial indirectly recognized this mix. As this debate continues, can we throw Option 3 into the hopper? This method seems to work very well for these two states. However, it is a compromise. (What a novel idea.)

John and Joanne Tobin, Evergreen


How can a venerable publication like The Denver Post, which prides itself as being “The Voice of the Rocky Mountain Empire” be so ill-informed and misguided in advocating for and promoting a popular vote for presidential elections? The claim that “Each vote for president in America should count as one vote” — while itself true — overlooks the fact that a popular vote would essentially negate all citizen votes in this and other regions. The Electoral College, a stroke of genius by our Founding Fathers, keeps people from all states “in the game.”

Curtis E. Burton, Highlands Ranch


The maps of election results for president for the second straight election show a large majority of the geographical country voting Republican and the vast majority of the inner-city populations of cities like New York voting Democratic.

Our country’s “civil war” is not just liberal vs. conservative. It is very much large-city urbanites vs. everyone else. It’s obvious just looking at results on a map: Washington state is liberal — no, it’s not, Seattle and other urban areas overpower the rest of the state. Look at New York State vs. New York City, along with the election maps of Georgia and Texas. Colorado is not “blue” — but the Denver/Boulder corridor is — and that makes much of the rest of the state irrelevant. If we want “fairness” in our culturally diverse nation, I have a completely different suggestion. Instead of eliminating the Electoral College, let’s require all states to set up an internal Electoral College. What do you say Grand Junction, Greeley and Cortez? Do you want to be relevant in Colorado politics?

Mark Harvey, Arvada

To send a letter to the editor about this article, submit online or check out our guidelines for how to submit by email or mail.

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Kiszla: Hey, John Elway. Has safety Justin Simmons shown enough to get richly deserved raise after saving Broncos’ victory against Miami?

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Isn’t it about time we put big-time respect, not to mention some serious cash, on the name of Broncos safety Justin Simmons?

During another Sunday afternoon when it seemed Denver was bent on inventing a way to lose, Simmons ended any notion of a Miami comeback and all the nonsense that can overwhelm a reeling NFL team by grabbing an interception to seal a 20-13 victory the Broncos desperately needed.

“Just knew they were going to take a shot there in the end zone with (Miami quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick) being so aggressive and just found a way to come down with the football,” Simmons said.

Money doesn’t need to brag. And Simmons is money.

So why won’t director of football operations John Elway pay him?

With the Denver defense looking dazed and confused by the FitzMagic being wielded by Miami’s wily backup quarterback, Simmons stepped up, stepping boldy in front of a pass intended for Dolphins receiver DeVante Parker in the end zone with 63 seconds remaining in the fourth quarter.

“He’s one of the best safeties in the league and I stand by that,” Broncos linebacker Malik Reed said.

Simmons is All-Pro material.

So why did the knuckleheads that vote for the Pro Bowl snub him a year ago?

Beats me. I don’t get a vote. Kindly file your grievances elsewhere.

If you want my truth, if Simmons’ peers don’t give him the proper respect, that’s their problem. Who cares?

But if Elway isn’t ready to give the 27-year-old safety a long-term contract, that’s a whole ‘nuther deal, not to mention a problem for a franchise that has had trouble doing the right thing since winning Super Bowl 50 nearly five years ago. Elway, who might be harder to beat at the negotiating table than he was on the field, slapped the franchise tag on Simmons for 2020 at a price of $11.44 million, when the difficult boss and his talented safety couldn’t reach a handshake on a contract that would make everybody happy.

Safeties Budda Baker of Arizona and Tyrann Mathieu from the Chiefs both get paid north of $14 million per year. Simmons, who has produced four interceptions already this season, is the equal of either of those guys.

Show Simmons the money, please. Let’s not mess around any longer. He has earned the respect inherent in a long-term contract.

Simmons cannot possibly get snubbed for the Pro Bowl again this season, can he? The real question should be: How does he start building a career where Simmons is a no-doubt selection for All-Pro honors each and every year?

“Obviously, you strive to be a Pro Bowl, All-Pro player in every regard,” Simmons said. “But the bigger picture for myself is just making sure I’m doing my job at a high level, doing what’s asked of me as a safety for our defense, and then making sure I’m bringing some guys along with me.”

Simmons makes teammates better. That’s how a leader rolls.

After Drew “Vapor” Lock threw a mindless interception on Denver’s first offensive possession of the game, a bad turnover that quickly staked Miami to a 7-0 lead, the Broncos settled down. They started scratching and clawing back with a fierce pass rush, grounding and pounding with slashing runs by Phillip Lindsay and Melvin Gordon, on their way to something we were all afraid this team had forgotten how to do:

Take a lead into the locker room at halftime. Hold the presses! The Broncos entered admission ahead 13-10.

“I’d alway like the early lead, that’s for (darn) sure,” Denver coach Vic Fangio said.

When the Broncos can play with a lead rather than trail in desperation, they can be the run-first team Elway built. Just as important, Denver pass-rushers can pin their orange ears back to not only make quarterback Tua Tagovailoa very blue with sacks, but also chase the ballyhooed rookie to the Miami bench early in the fourth quarter with battered confidence.

Now that’s the formula to let Lock develop patiently and the Broncos win more regularly.

“We’d definitely like to play that style of play both sides of the ball,” Fangio said.

After four consecutive games that saw a once-dominant defense surrender 30 or more points, including an embarrassing 37-12 shellacking by da hated Raid-uhs, this is precisely the biceps-flexing performance the Broncos needed to rebuild the faith and renew trust in teammates.

What changed?

“It was kind of just being angry about how last week went down and we just know we’re better than that,” Simmons said.

Yes, the Denver D has missed linebacker Von Miller, whose ankle injury made this team feel as if it was being stalked by dark clouds before this weird NFL season even began. But the Vonster is the Broncos’ glorious past, and coming off injury on the wrong side of his 30th birthday, Miller might well have to take a paycut to remain with the team in 2021.

Simmons is not only the current leader of this defense but its future.

Put some respect on his name, Mr. Elway.

And we all know the only genuine way to R-E-S-P-E-C-T in pro sports.

It’s spelled M-O-N-E-Y.

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Drew Lock felt “determined” to rally Broncos against Miami, sore rib and all

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He was less Buzz Lightyear than Missouri mule, stubborn to the last. But Drew Lock wasn’t going to let a sore rib get in the way of a Week 11 start against the Miami Dolphins at home.

“I was extremely determined (to play),” Lock said after throwing for 270 yards and rushing for 23 more in a 20-13 win Sunday at Empower Field at Mile High. “There was a lot of playing-this-week or not-playing-this-week (speculation). There was going to be nothing, pain-wise, that was going to stop me playing.”

Lock appeared to suffer a rib strain during the second quarter of a Week 10 shellacking against the Raiders in Las Vegas, leaving his status for the Dolphins tussle in the air for much of the prep time leading up to Sunday. The second-year quarterback admitted after the game that the pain meant “it wasn’t an easy week of practice,” or all that comfortable in the heat of battle.

But the former University of Missouri standout gutted through his 13th NFL appearance — the win pushed his career mark as a starter back over .500, to 7-6 — against a Dolphins defense that came into the afternoon ranked fifth in the NFL in fewest points allowed per game (20.2) and No. 6 in turnovers forced per opponent possession (15.5%).

“For him to come out here and be resilient and do what he needed to do to help his team, and lead after he took so much heat last week,” said tailback Melvin Gordon, who paced a salty Broncos running attack with 84 yards, “it just shows the type of player he is.”

Especially given that the hosts’ first drive had ended on a Lock pick, making it the sixth consecutive game in which the signal-caller had thrown an interception. Trailing 7-0 versus a young Miami team that came in riding a five-game winning streak that included road wins at San Francisco and Arizona, Lock set the tone for the rest of the game during the Broncos’ third drive.

Facing a third-and-10 at his own 27 after two incompletions to open the series, Lock hit rookie KJ Hamler for a 15-yard gain. On third-and-13 at the Miami 39, Lock scrambled to his right and rambled, sore rib and all, for a 14-yard gain and another first down. Three plays later, the Broncos scored their first touchdown of the day on a 1-yard Gordon dive.

“Those are plays that we’ve got to have in these games,” Lock said of his third-down toss. “And they’re there for us to make.

“And that was one of the plays that maybe last week or the week before, we don’t make, and we’re coming off the field. It’s a different vibe going to the sidelines. So I’m proud of us for always progressing.”

Speaking of progressing: Sunday’s second half, in which the Broncos outscored Miami 7-3, was Lock’s first half of football without a turnover since the opening half of a Week 9 loss at Atlanta.

“I think Drew comes back from bad plays,” said coach Vic Fangio. “That’s one of his good qualities. I don’t think he lets it linger and has a hangover from it.”

It also helped that the Broncos built a lead at the half — their first cushion at the break since Week 6 at New England — and could therefore lean on the running game behind Gordon and backfield mate Phillip Lindsay (82 rushing yards). Miami crowding the box also opened up good looks for Lock on bootlegs and roll-outs, especially to his right.

“We let (Lock) know he doesn’t have to take the world on by himself,” Lindsay said after the game. “There’s 10 more of us (on offense), doing it as a unit.”

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Drew Lock felt “determined” to rally Broncos against Miami, sore rib and all

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He was less Buzz Lightyear than Missouri mule, stubborn to the last. But Drew Lock wasn’t going to let a sore rib get in the way of a Week 11 start against the Miami Dolphins at home.

“I was extremely determined (to play),” Lock said after throwing for 270 yards and rushing for 23 more in a 20-13 win Sunday at Empower Field at Mile High. “There was a lot of playing-this-week or not-playing-this-week (speculation). There was going to be nothing, pain-wise, that was going to stop me playing.”

Lock appeared to suffer a rib strain during the second quarter of a Week 10 shellacking against the Raiders in Las Vegas, leaving his status for the Dolphins tussle in the air for much of the prep time leading up to Sunday. The second-year quarterback admitted after the game that the pain meant “it wasn’t an easy week of practice,” or all that comfortable in the heat of battle.

But the former University of Missouri standout gutted through his 13th NFL appearance — the win pushed his career mark as a starter back over .500, to 7-6 — against a Dolphins defense that came into the afternoon ranked fifth in the NFL in fewest points allowed per game (20.2) and No. 6 in turnovers forced per opponent possession (15.5%).

“For him to come out here and be resilient and do what he needed to do to help his team, and lead after he took so much heat last week,” said tailback Melvin Gordon, who paced a salty Broncos running attack with 84 yards, “it just shows the type of player he is.”

Especially given that the hosts’ first drive had ended on a Lock pick, making it the sixth consecutive game in which the signal-caller had thrown an interception. Trailing 7-0 versus a young Miami team that came in riding a five-game winning streak that included road wins at San Francisco and Arizona, Lock set the tone for the rest of the game during the Broncos’ third drive.

Facing a third-and-10 at his own 27 after two incompletions to open the series, Lock hit rookie KJ Hamler for a 15-yard gain. On third-and-13 at the Miami 39, Lock scrambled to his right and rambled, sore rib and all, for a 14-yard gain and another first down. Three plays later, the Broncos scored their first touchdown of the day on a 1-yard Gordon dive.

“Those are plays that we’ve got to have in these games,” Lock said of his third-down toss. “And they’re there for us to make.

“And that was one of the plays that maybe last week or the week before, we don’t make, and we’re coming off the field. It’s a different vibe going to the sidelines. So I’m proud of us for always progressing.”

Speaking of progressing: Sunday’s second half, in which the Broncos outscored Miami 7-3, was Lock’s first half of football without a turnover since the opening half of a Week 9 loss at Atlanta.

“I think Drew comes back from bad plays,” said coach Vic Fangio. “That’s one of his good qualities. I don’t think he lets it linger and has a hangover from it.”

It also helped that the Broncos built a lead at the half — their first cushion at the break since Week 6 at New England — and could therefore lean on the running game behind Gordon and backfield mate Phillip Lindsay (82 rushing yards). Miami crowding the box also opened up good looks for Lock on bootlegs and roll-outs, especially to his right.

“We let (Lock) know he doesn’t have to take the world on by himself,” Lindsay said after the game. “There’s 10 more of us (on offense), doing it as a unit.”

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Drew Lock felt “determined” to rally Broncos against Miami, sore rib and all

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He was less Buzz Lightyear than Missouri mule, stubborn to the last. But Drew Lock wasn’t going to let a sore rib get in the way of a Week 11 start against the Miami Dolphins at home.

“I was extremely determined (to play),” Lock said after throwing for 270 yards and rushing for 23 more in a 20-13 win Sunday at Empower Field at Mile High. “There was a lot of playing-this-week or not-playing-this-week (speculation). There was going to be nothing, pain-wise, that was going to stop me playing.”

Lock appeared to suffer a rib strain during the second quarter of a Week 10 shellacking against the Raiders in Las Vegas, leaving his status for the Dolphins tussle in the air for much of the prep time leading up to Sunday. The second-year quarterback admitted after the game that the pain meant “it wasn’t an easy week of practice,” or all that comfortable in the heat of battle.

But the former University of Missouri standout gutted through his 13th NFL appearance — the win pushed his career mark as a starter back over .500, to 7-6 — against a Dolphins defense that came into the afternoon ranked fifth in the NFL in fewest points allowed per game (20.2) and No. 6 in turnovers forced per opponent possession (15.5%).

“For him to come out here and be resilient and do what he needed to do to help his team, and lead after he took so much heat last week,” said tailback Melvin Gordon, who paced a salty Broncos running attack with 84 yards, “it just shows the type of player he is.”

Especially given that the hosts’ first drive had ended on a Lock pick, making it the sixth consecutive game in which the signal-caller had thrown an interception. Trailing 7-0 versus a young Miami team that came in riding a five-game winning streak that included road wins at San Francisco and Arizona, Lock set the tone for the rest of the game during the Broncos’ third drive.

Facing a third-and-10 at his own 27 after two incompletions to open the series, Lock hit rookie KJ Hamler for a 15-yard gain. On third-and-13 at the Miami 39, Lock scrambled to his right and rambled, sore rib and all, for a 14-yard gain and another first down. Three plays later, the Broncos scored their first touchdown of the day on a 1-yard Gordon dive.

“Those are plays that we’ve got to have in these games,” Lock said of his third-down toss. “And they’re there for us to make.

“And that was one of the plays that maybe last week or the week before, we don’t make, and we’re coming off the field. It’s a different vibe going to the sidelines. So I’m proud of us for always progressing.”

Speaking of progressing: Sunday’s second half, in which the Broncos outscored Miami 7-3, was Lock’s first half of football without a turnover since the opening half of a Week 9 loss at Atlanta.

“I think Drew comes back from bad plays,” said coach Vic Fangio. “That’s one of his good qualities. I don’t think he lets it linger and has a hangover from it.”

It also helped that the Broncos built a lead at the half — their first cushion at the break since Week 6 at New England — and could therefore lean on the running game behind Gordon and backfield mate Phillip Lindsay (82 rushing yards). Miami crowding the box also opened up good looks for Lock on bootlegs and roll-outs, especially to his right.

“We let (Lock) know he doesn’t have to take the world on by himself,” Lindsay said after the game. “There’s 10 more of us (on offense), doing it as a unit.”

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Drew Lock felt “determined” to rally Broncos against Miami, sore rib and all

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He was less Buzz Lightyear than Missouri mule, stubborn to the last. But Drew Lock wasn’t going to let a sore rib get in the way of a Week 11 start against the Miami Dolphins at home.

“I was extremely determined (to play),” Lock said after throwing for 270 yards and rushing for 23 more in a 20-13 win Sunday at Empower Field at Mile High. “There was a lot of playing-this-week or not-playing-this-week (speculation). There was going to be nothing, pain-wise, that was going to stop me playing.”

Lock appeared to suffer a rib strain during the second quarter of a Week 10 shellacking against the Raiders in Las Vegas, leaving his status for the Dolphins tussle in the air for much of the prep time leading up to Sunday. The second-year quarterback admitted after the game that the pain meant “it wasn’t an easy week of practice,” or all that comfortable in the heat of battle.

But the former University of Missouri standout gutted through his 13th NFL appearance — the win pushed his career mark as a starter back over .500, to 7-6 — against a Dolphins defense that came into the afternoon ranked fifth in the NFL in fewest points allowed per game (20.2) and No. 6 in turnovers forced per opponent possession (15.5%).

“For him to come out here and be resilient and do what he needed to do to help his team, and lead after he took so much heat last week,” said tailback Melvin Gordon, who paced a salty Broncos running attack with 84 yards, “it just shows the type of player he is.”

Especially given that the hosts’ first drive had ended on a Lock pick, making it the sixth consecutive game in which the signal-caller had thrown an interception. Trailing 7-0 versus a young Miami team that came in riding a five-game winning streak that included road wins at San Francisco and Arizona, Lock set the tone for the rest of the game during the Broncos’ third drive.

Facing a third-and-10 at his own 27 after two incompletions to open the series, Lock hit rookie KJ Hamler for a 15-yard gain. On third-and-13 at the Miami 39, Lock scrambled to his right and rambled, sore rib and all, for a 14-yard gain and another first down. Three plays later, the Broncos scored their first touchdown of the day on a 1-yard Gordon dive.

“Those are plays that we’ve got to have in these games,” Lock said of his third-down toss. “And they’re there for us to make.

“And that was one of the plays that maybe last week or the week before, we don’t make, and we’re coming off the field. It’s a different vibe going to the sidelines. So I’m proud of us for always progressing.”

Speaking of progressing: Sunday’s second half, in which the Broncos outscored Miami 7-3, was Lock’s first half of football without a turnover since the opening half of a Week 9 loss at Atlanta.

“I think Drew comes back from bad plays,” said coach Vic Fangio. “That’s one of his good qualities. I don’t think he lets it linger and has a hangover from it.”

It also helped that the Broncos built a lead at the half — their first cushion at the break since Week 6 at New England — and could therefore lean on the running game behind Gordon and backfield mate Phillip Lindsay (82 rushing yards). Miami crowding the box also opened up good looks for Lock on bootlegs and roll-outs, especially to his right.

“We let (Lock) know he doesn’t have to take the world on by himself,” Lindsay said after the game. “There’s 10 more of us (on offense), doing it as a unit.”

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Denver County, Colorado

Drew Lock felt “determined” to rally Broncos against Miami, sore rib and all

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He was less Buzz Lightyear than Missouri mule, stubborn to the last. But Drew Lock wasn’t going to let a sore rib get in the way of a Week 11 start against the Miami Dolphins at home.

“I was extremely determined (to play),” Lock said after throwing for 270 yards and rushing for 23 more in a 20-13 win Sunday at Empower Field at Mile High. “There was a lot of playing-this-week or not-playing-this-week (speculation). There was going to be nothing, pain-wise, that was going to stop me playing.”

Lock appeared to suffer a rib strain during the second quarter of a Week 10 shellacking against the Raiders in Las Vegas, leaving his status for the Dolphins tussle in the air for much of the prep time leading up to Sunday. The second-year quarterback admitted after the game that the pain meant “it wasn’t an easy week of practice,” or all that comfortable in the heat of battle.

But the former University of Missouri standout gutted through his 13th NFL appearance — the win pushed his career mark as a starter back over .500, to 7-6 — against a Dolphins defense that came into the afternoon ranked fifth in the NFL in fewest points allowed per game (20.2) and No. 6 in turnovers forced per opponent possession (15.5%).

“For him to come out here and be resilient and do what he needed to do to help his team, and lead after he took so much heat last week,” said tailback Melvin Gordon, who paced a salty Broncos running attack with 84 yards, “it just shows the type of player he is.”

Especially given that the hosts’ first drive had ended on a Lock pick, making it the sixth consecutive game in which the signal-caller had thrown an interception. Trailing 7-0 versus a young Miami team that came in riding a five-game winning streak that included road wins at San Francisco and Arizona, Lock set the tone for the rest of the game during the Broncos’ third drive.

Facing a third-and-10 at his own 27 after two incompletions to open the series, Lock hit rookie KJ Hamler for a 15-yard gain. On third-and-13 at the Miami 39, Lock scrambled to his right and rambled, sore rib and all, for a 14-yard gain and another first down. Three plays later, the Broncos scored their first touchdown of the day on a 1-yard Gordon dive.

“Those are plays that we’ve got to have in these games,” Lock said of his third-down toss. “And they’re there for us to make.

“And that was one of the plays that maybe last week or the week before, we don’t make, and we’re coming off the field. It’s a different vibe going to the sidelines. So I’m proud of us for always progressing.”

Speaking of progressing: Sunday’s second half, in which the Broncos outscored Miami 7-3, was Lock’s first half of football without a turnover since the opening half of a Week 9 loss at Atlanta.

“I think Drew comes back from bad plays,” said coach Vic Fangio. “That’s one of his good qualities. I don’t think he lets it linger and has a hangover from it.”

It also helped that the Broncos built a lead at the half — their first cushion at the break since Week 6 at New England — and could therefore lean on the running game behind Gordon and backfield mate Phillip Lindsay (82 rushing yards). Miami crowding the box also opened up good looks for Lock on bootlegs and roll-outs, especially to his right.

“We let (Lock) know he doesn’t have to take the world on by himself,” Lindsay said after the game. “There’s 10 more of us (on offense), doing it as a unit.”

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Denver County, Colorado

Northbound I-25 reopened after motorcycle crash closes highway at 17th Street

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Northbound Interstate 25 at 17th Street has been reopened after closing due to a motorcycle crash, according to Denver police.

The driver of the motorcycle suffered serious but non-life-threatening injuries, police say.

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Denver County, Colorado

Northbound I-25 reopened after motorcycle crash closes highway at 17th Street

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Northbound Interstate 25 at 17th Street has been reopened after closing due to a motorcycle crash, according to Denver police.

The driver of the motorcycle suffered serious but non-life-threatening injuries, police say.

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Denver County, Colorado

Northbound I-25 reopened after motorcycle crash closes highway at 17th Street

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Northbound Interstate 25 at 17th Street has been reopened after closing due to a motorcycle crash, according to Denver police.

The driver of the motorcycle suffered serious but non-life-threatening injuries, police say.

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Denver County, Colorado

Rapids’ season comes to end in MLS Cup Playoffs loss at Minnesota

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Minnesota United FC had not lost a game in 2020 when scoring first entering Sunday night’s do-or-die matchup against the Colorado Rapids — and the Loons still haven’t.

Minnesota netted an early goal in the MLS Cup Playoffs match at Allianz Field, then sat back and countered any Rapids chances to claim a 3-0 victory that ended Colorado’s season.

“It’s not very often you lose a game 3-0 and you think that you should have won,” Rapids coach Robin Fraser said. “This is a young team going through this experience for the first time. You have to be able to be solid, which we were throughout most of night, but not as consistently as we needed.”

The Loons used the Rapids’ youth against them and outworked Colorado. Emanuel Reynoso assisted on all three scores and Kevin Molino scored twice to send the Rapids packing.

A benign throw-in on the Rapids’ side of the field turned disastrous in the 22nd minute when sloppy defending let a ball squirt through. Molino won the loose ball to Reynoso, who dribbled to the top of the box before being taken off the ball. It was left for Molino straight away and he sent it past William Yarbrough. The play originated on the left side of the field where Sam Vines normally would be. The Rapids ironman started the game on the bench because of a hamstring injury. He subbed on late and Kellyn Acosta played left back for the first time in years.

“Vines was hurt, we were being cautious and didn’t want to play him,” Fraser said. “Kellyn did a really good job, his decision making was very good.”

Less than 10 minutes later Reynoso tried to capitalize on the counter-attack. A three-on-one rush for the Loons ended with Reynoso hitting the post.

Just after the break, the Rapids came out on fire. Getting top-notch scoring chances, the Rapids were not able to score. Cole Bassett had a few opportunities in a several-minute span, including one where goalie Dayne St. Clair was on the ground but Bakaye Dibassy cleared it off the goaline. There was a sequence that ended with Nico Benezet being dragged down in the box, but no foul was called. The Rapids are the only team in MLS to not earn a penalty kick this year.

The pressure without punctuation was costly. An errant pass from Jack Price was intercepted in the midfield which led to a 3-on-3 counter the other way. Reynoso grounded a pass wide to Robin Lod. The Finnish attacker finished the rush by catching Yarbrough out of position, making Minnesota’s lead 2-0.

“There’s times where we turned over too easily. We knew the pressure was coming, we just have to be better individually at times,” Price said. “The second goal to give the ball away in the midfield, it’s unlike me and I shouldn’t ever do that but I’ll learn from it, I won’t do it again.”

A tired Rapids team could not do much when Molino found a loose ball in the box in the 79th minute. Molino chipped it over Yarbrough, giving the Loons their third goal. A good passing play from Reynoso and Jan Gregus led to the insurance score.

“We’re obviously proud of making the playoffs, but we’re still very disappointed. We felt like we deserved more tonight,” Price said. “Being more clinical and execution, that was the difference between them and us. They have a more experienced team. We’ll come back stronger and we will be the experienced team.”

Bigger picture

The Rapids had a fantastic end to their season collecting three wins over five matches in 15 days. The chaotic 2020 has come to an end but the future is bright.

Colorado fielded one of the youngest teams in MLS this season and got most of their production from the kids. The club’s goal is to become an annual playoff team, which cannot happen unless you make the postseason the first time.

The Rapids seem to have found their leader as Robin Fraser is the winningest coach in club history through his first 25 games. There are moves to be made this offseason to help the young core, but ultimately the Rapids’ future will be based on the development of their younger players.

What’s ahead

Minnesota United plays at Children’s Mercy Park on Dec. 1 or Dec. 2 against Western Conference top-seed Sporting Kansas City, which won its first-round game Sunday against San Jose in a wild match that went to penalty kicks.

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Denver County, Colorado

Rapids’ season comes to end in MLS Cup Playoffs loss at Minnesota

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Minnesota United FC had not lost a game in 2020 when scoring first entering Sunday night’s do-or-die matchup against the Colorado Rapids — and the Loons still haven’t.

Minnesota netted an early goal in the MLS Cup Playoffs match at Allianz Field, then sat back and countered any Rapids chances to claim a 3-0 victory that ended Colorado’s season.

“It’s not very often you lose a game 3-0 and you think that you should have won,” Rapids coach Robin Fraser said. “This is a young team going through this experience for the first time. You have to be able to be solid, which we were throughout most of night, but not as consistently as we needed.”

The Loons used the Rapids’ youth against them and outworked Colorado. Emanuel Reynoso assisted on all three scores and Kevin Molino scored twice to send the Rapids packing.

A benign throw-in on the Rapids’ side of the field turned disastrous in the 22nd minute when sloppy defending let a ball squirt through. Molino won the loose ball to Reynoso, who dribbled to the top of the box before being taken off the ball. It was left for Molino straight away and he sent it past William Yarbrough. The play originated on the left side of the field where Sam Vines normally would be. The Rapids ironman started the game on the bench because of a hamstring injury. He subbed on late and Kellyn Acosta played left back for the first time in years.

“Vines was hurt, we were being cautious and didn’t want to play him,” Fraser said. “Kellyn did a really good job, his decision making was very good.”

Less than 10 minutes later Reynoso tried to capitalize on the counter-attack. A three-on-one rush for the Loons ended with Reynoso hitting the post.

Just after the break, the Rapids came out on fire. Getting top-notch scoring chances, the Rapids were not able to score. Cole Bassett had a few opportunities in a several-minute span, including one where goalie Dayne St. Clair was on the ground but Bakaye Dibassy cleared it off the goaline. There was a sequence that ended with Nico Benezet being dragged down in the box, but no foul was called. The Rapids are the only team in MLS to not earn a penalty kick this year.

The pressure without punctuation was costly. An errant pass from Jack Price was intercepted in the midfield which led to a 3-on-3 counter the other way. Reynoso grounded a pass wide to Robin Lod. The Finnish attacker finished the rush by catching Yarbrough out of position, making Minnesota’s lead 2-0.

“There’s times where we turned over too easily. We knew the pressure was coming, we just have to be better individually at times,” Price said. “The second goal to give the ball away in the midfield, it’s unlike me and I shouldn’t ever do that but I’ll learn from it, I won’t do it again.”

A tired Rapids team could not do much when Molino found a loose ball in the box in the 79th minute. Molino chipped it over Yarbrough, giving the Loons their third goal. A good passing play from Reynoso and Jan Gregus led to the insurance score.

“We’re obviously proud of making the playoffs, but we’re still very disappointed. We felt like we deserved more tonight,” Price said. “Being more clinical and execution, that was the difference between them and us. They have a more experienced team. We’ll come back stronger and we will be the experienced team.”

Bigger picture

The Rapids had a fantastic end to their season collecting three wins over five matches in 15 days. The chaotic 2020 has come to an end but the future is bright.

Colorado fielded one of the youngest teams in MLS this season and got most of their production from the kids. The club’s goal is to become an annual playoff team, which cannot happen unless you make the postseason the first time.

The Rapids seem to have found their leader as Robin Fraser is the winningest coach in club history through his first 25 games. There are moves to be made this offseason to help the young core, but ultimately the Rapids’ future will be based on the development of their younger players.

What’s ahead

Minnesota United plays at Children’s Mercy Park on Dec. 1 or Dec. 2 against Western Conference top-seed Sporting Kansas City, which won its first-round game Sunday against San Jose in a wild match that went to penalty kicks.

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Denver County, Colorado

Mountain snow Monday, metro snow early Tuesday

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Mountain snow Monday, metro snow early Tuesday

Sunny, windy and cool Sunday with highs in the lower 50s. Warmer Monday ahead of a storm that will bring cold and a chance for snow Tuesday

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Denver County, Colorado

“Proud” Shiffrin comes runner-up to Vlhova in comeback race

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LEVI, Finland — Mikaela Shiffrin, racing for the first time since January, settled for second place behind Petra Vlhova in a World Cup slalom on Saturday but still “felt a lot of happiness” to finally get back in the start gate.

“I enjoy a second place more than I did ever before,” said Shiffrin, a winner of 66 World Cup races, “because I felt I was pushing and having some good skiing. It was the best I could today. I feel I can be more proud of that than I used to be.”

Vlhova, the World Cup slalom champion from Slovakia, posted the fastest times in both runs to beat the American by 0.18 seconds in Finnish Lapland, north of the Arctic Circle.

But for Shiffrin, the result wasn’t her biggest concern.

“It’s been really hard to imagine being here again and racing. And being on the podium, that’s just something I almost didn’t dare to really imagine, because you don’t want to be disappointed again,” the double Olympic and three-time overall champion said.

Shiffrin’s previous season ended prematurely after the death of her father, Jeff Shiffrin. That was followed by the cancellation of the season-ending races amid the coronavirus outbreak, and then she sat out the first race of the new season in Austria in October with a back injury.

The 25-year-old Shiffrin had wondered whether she wanted to continue her ski racing career, but after Saturday’s race she sounded optimistic.

“I hope from here I can keep going because I want to,” she said. “I felt a lot of happiness skiing today, and racing. I had fun and I felt I did some really good skiing. After everything that has happened, it is really cool to just be able to ski race and get a podium, and get a second place, that’s like, wow!”

Racing the second run on a course set by her coach Livio Magoni, Vlhova earned her fourth straight slalom win.

“I tried to take this advantage that my coach set the course, and I did it,” Vlhova said. “It wasn’t easy, as it started snowing and also the course was a bit destroyed. But I did it and I am really happy. First victory in the first slalom of the season is always good.”

Austria’s Katharina Liensberger was 0.57 behind in third, while the rest of the field, led by Swiss racer Wendy Holdener, was at least 1.35 off the lead.

Wearing bib No. 1, Shiffrin had opened the race with an error-free run.

Vlhova trailed Shiffrin by 0.13 at the first split but was ahead of the American at all following check points before finishing 0.15 ahead.

In the final run, Vlhova initially extended her lead to 0.52 but lost over three tenths as she failed to match Shiffrin’s pace in the flat finish section.

“In the second run you start last and want to confirm you first run. That’s pressure. It was not a perfect run because I did some mistakes. But at the end it was green,” said Vlhova, referring to the color in which leading times are displayed on a video-wall in the finish area.

In a streak that started in January 2017, the last 27 World Cup slaloms have all been won by either Shiffrin, with 19 wins, or Vlhova.

Vlhova won the season-long slalom title last year, edging Shiffrin by 20 points, after the American had won it six times in the previous seven seasons.

The pair continued their dominance in Saturday’s race.

“Nothing’s changed, but also everything’s changed,” Shiffrin said. “But it’s really fun to be here, to see everybody skiing. It’s fun to watch and for me it was fun to do.”

Federica Brignone, who ended Shiffrin’s three-year reign as overall champion last season, was 1.61 behind after the opening run but failed to finish her second and didn’t score World Cup points.

Italian teammate Marta Bassino, who won the season-opener last month, finished more than three seconds behind in 18th.

Slalom specialist Anna Swenn Larsson missed the race as the entire Swedish team quarantined after a COVID-19 test for one of its coaches came back positive.

A limited number of spectators were allowed at the race.

Another women’s slalom is scheduled for Sunday.

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Denver County, Colorado

4A No. 1 Dakota Ridge has offensive explosion in win against No. 8 Montrose

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4A No. 1 Dakota Ridge has offensive explosion in win against No. 8 Montrose

The Eagles looked dominant in the 76-34 win on their way to the semifinals.

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