Kirwin National Wildlife Refuge

Kirwin National Wildlife Refuge

– Many of you are aware and are probably birdwatchers and know much more than I do but Kansas is a very significant flyover not just for airplanes, but for birds. And so those birds that are flying over got to stop and have a place to rest. So let’s take a look today at the Kirwin National Wildlife Refuge. What a fascinating place and I believe that they are open that Visitor Center is open even during COVID you might check it out but the Refuge will be open no matter what. So check them out, do give them a call or, or, you know ask just to make sure but my information tells me that they’re always keeping the gates open. So let’s take a look at this incredible Wildlife Refuge.

– Kirwin National Wildlife Refuge was established to conserve, maintain, and manage wildlife and habitat for migratory birds. The nearly 11,000 acre Kirwin Refuge is located in the rolling hills and narrow valley of the North Fork of the Solomon River and Phillips County. The refuge lies in an area where the tall grass prairies of the east meet the short grass plains of the west. As a result of this merging of prairies and plains, grasses, and wildlife common to both habitats are found on the Refuge. Over 10,000 migrating waterfowl can be seen on the Refuge during fall through early winter. Other migratory birds, including the endangered whooping crane can be found on the refuge. Since the emphasis is on migratory birds, the Refuge provides food, shelter and nesting areas for migratory birds such as grassland dependents, tree-dwelling neotropicals, waterfowl, and shorebirds. Depending on reservoir water levels, Refuge staff use a variety of management practices. Corn, wheat and milo are grown through a cooperative farming program, with a portion of the crop left in the field to provide food for migrating waterfowl and resident wildlife. Other management tools include grazing, brush control, haying, mowing, and controlled burning. To minimize disturbance to wildlife and to comply with Federal laws, policies and regulations, these activities are prohibited on the Refuge. Camping, fires, water skiing, personal watercraft like jet-skis, speed boating, swimming, collecting plants, animals, including antlers or historical artifacts, fireworks, dogs and other pets must be on a leash, littering, disorderly conduct, intoxication, commercial use including guiding. The list of don’ts is long because the number of birds depending on the site is so long. Respect the property and its purpose. Take the kids and do some amazing bird gazing.

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