The story of Quindaro with Michelle Martin

The story of Quindaro with Michelle Martin

A couple of of weeks ago, I was involved in a presentation for the Lewis and Clark society in Kansas City. And my friends Kristen and Holly Zane were part of that as well. And they are enrolled members of the wind nation and Holly talked quite a bit about the story of Quinn Daro. They’re in Kansas City, Kansas. And it is a remarkable story, and Michelle is going to share some of that with you this morning. Good morning, Michelle. Looking very sparkly today.

Good morning, Deb. Today, as we continue to celebrate Black History Month, let’s take a look at the Kansas territorial community of quin Daro and learn about its legacy. With the settlement of Kansas territory in 1854. The issue of slavery and its expansion westward, migrated with the men, women and children who came to Kansas seeking opportunity for those who opposed slavery. And for those escaping from slavery, Kansas became a beacon of freedom. Charles Robinson, with the assistance of Appleyard Guthrie and his wife, Nancy Quinn darro Guthrie, the daughter of a lion leader, secured lands to establish an anti slavery town site along the Missouri River. The Quinn Daro town site was purchased from the lion and named for Nancy. The population of Quinn narrow grew quickly, and the town boasted a newspaper, a four story hotel with 45 rooms, a brewery, churches, dry goods stores, a massive sawmill and a lumber yard. Prior to the Civil War, the community was home to a free African American community as well. With the help of local farmers, the Wyandotte people and abolitionists like color Anna Nichols, Quinn Daro became a stop on the Underground Railroad. The civil wars are changing Quinn daros fortunes, with so many young men off to the war, the population declined. The town’s charter was revoked in 1862, and the town became an outpost for the ninth Kansas volunteers. Many of the original buildings were destroyed during the war, the town persevered and became an educational hub. Reverend Evan blatchley and his wife Jane operated a school for free African Americans and escaped enslaved persons during the war. This educational endeavor prospered and after the Civil War was rechristened Western University. The university was an anchor for the African American community that called Quinn darl. home by the 1930s. Quinn Daro, like many communities suffered during the Great Depression. During World War Two when daros young men went off to war once again, and the town’s population declined. The community was eventually absorbed by Kansas City, Kansas, and after time, many of the town’s original structures were abandoned and reclaimed by nature, and the 1980s a proposed landfill project was slated for quin Daro, community activists, residents, historians and preservationists join together in an effort to stop the landfill, archaeological excavations on earth remnants of quin daros 19th century past to preserve it for future generations. In 2002, the Quinn Daro town site was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. And in April 2019, the Quinn Darrow townsite National commemorative site was dedicated. Today, the history of Quinn Daro is preserved and shared by those who lived in the community, and those who wish its story to never fade from memory. I hope you enjoy today’s look at Quinn Daro, and that you’ll join me next time for another historical adventure somewhere around Kansas.

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